What we are working on

 

 PHOTO CREDIT:  Ananta Chowdhury 

PHOTO CREDIT:  Ananta Chowdhury 

Modern Slavery and Human Rights in Global Supply Chain

The governance gaps associated with globalisation and international business activities give rise to a need to find more effective ways to ensure that human rights, adequate labour standards and environmental protection are recognised within global supply chains. In recent years international efforts to fight modern slavery, forced labour and human trafficking have increased and involve both public actors and private corporations.

Research in this area includes work on legal mechanisms through which to address supply chain challenges, the implications and operationalisation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in supply chains, exercising corporate human rights due diligence and effectively disclosing such efforts through non-financial reporting frameworks and the development of effective monitoring supply chain conditions and addressing grievances. Our research focuses on the normative developments to protect human rights from modern slavery, forced labour and human trafficking, especially in the framework of the application of the Modern Slavery Act (UK). We are working with public bodies and private companies to guide and support them to draft their Modern Slavery Transparency in the Supply Chain Statement through our training and consultancy services. For our work on Modern Slavery and Public Procurement click here


Business, Conflict and Human Rights

 PHOTO CREDIT: Lisa Kristine

PHOTO CREDIT: Lisa Kristine

 The standard of corporate human rights due diligence has become central to the definition of the corporate responsibility to respect human rights. The normative development of this standard is taking place, among others, within the framework of the national and international efforts to regulate conflict minerals and break the link between mining and financing of illegal armed groups. Our work has explored this regulation and its impact on the development of due diligence requirements and practice. We have also focused more generally on the interactions between conflict (widely understood as social conflict, including armed conflict), business and human rights and are part of a leading network on the topic, the Network on Business, Conflict and Human Rights. We are also part of CEIDA, a network on CSR in Extractive Industries in Developing Areas, lead by the Institute for Social Innovation, ESADE (Barcelona).

Also within this area of work, William Rook is engaged with doctoral research into the legal framework governing mining and local communities in parts of Africa. The research seeks to understand the complex legal and regulatory relationships between key actors including local communities, multinational corporations, international institutions and home and host states and to understand the implications of these in terms of particular rights.

Ms. Veronica Torres' doctorate looks at land use, land rights and human rights in the context of those industries which rely on the exploitation of land in Latin America, including extractive and agribusiness industries. Veronica coordinates the Land Rights and Social Conflict Working Group of the Network on Business, Conflict and Human Rights.


Socially Responsible Public Procurement 

States are the primary bearers of the obligation to protect human rights against violations committed by third parties, including companies. Whilst public procurement has been used to achieve social objectives for decades, it is only recently that it is being considered a tool for the promotion and protection of human rights in the global supply chain. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights mention public procurement as one of the instruments available to the state to fulfil its duty to protect (UNGP 6). We are at the forefront of this research with our work on socially responsible public procurement of electronics and modern slavery, forced labour and human trafficking on the public supply chain. Our collaborative work with civil society organisation led to the creation of Electronics Watch, an independent monitoring organisation working to achieve respect for labour rights in the global electronics industry through socially responsible public purchasing in Europe. As part of the informal Advisory Group, we have worked directly with Electronics Watch on the development of key aspects of the initiative including due diligence guidance, a code of labour standards and contract performance clauses. Olga is also a member of its Board of Trustees. In December 2016 the BHRE hosted the first Electronics Watch Affiliate Meeting

The BHRE is a member of the International Learning Lab on Human Rights and Public Procurement, a network of academics and NGOs producing policy relevant research to further develop the potential of socially responsible public procurement and advice governments on how to capitalise their buying power. The BHRE leads the Electronics Hub of the International Learning Lab. 

We have also worked closely with the London Universities Purchasing Consortium (LUPC), to which Olga is a member of its Board of Directors, to support London universities, art galleries, museums, theatres and music venues to manage their human rights risks in the supply chain. Nation-wide we provide training through the Higher Education Procurement Academy (HEPA). See our training and consultancy services.

 PHOTO CREDIT: HARDWARE HANK

PHOTO CREDIT: HARDWARE HANK


 PHOTO CREDIT: olga martin-ortega

PHOTO CREDIT: olga martin-ortega

Business, Human Rights and Transitional Justice 

As part of our work on business, conflict and human rights we are starting a new research line on Business, Human Rights and Transitional Justice. We are exploring the relationship between commercial activities and conflict; avenues to hold corporations accountable for human rights violations during conflict and during periods of transition and the role of business in post-conflict reconstruction and justice.  

In the photo, the AcerolMittal Orbit in London, which has been declared Memorial in Exile for survivors and victims of the Omarska concentration camp, run by Bosnian Serb forces in the mining town of Omarska, near Prijedor in northern Bosnia and Herzegovina.